IMPACT TO SKIING
January 26, 2021
IMPACT TO COMMUNITIES
January 3, 2021
IMPACT TO WILDERNESS & GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARKIMPACT TO WILDERNESS & GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK

Slide the arrows on the picture to see the difference between Fred's Mountain in 1872 before the ski resort and how it looks today. You will immediately notice the change in landscape and scar across the hill from the service road. This could become the fate of South Bowl and Mono Trees if Grand Targhee Expansion is approved.

Photo credit - Before: William H. Jackson, US Geological Survey; 1872. After: Mike Merigliano; 2017

IMPACT TO WILDERNESS & GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARKIMPACT TO WILDERNESS & GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK

Slide the arrows on the picture to see the difference between Fred's Mountain in 1872 before the ski resort and how it looks today. You will immediately notice the change in landscape and scar across the hill from the service road. This could become the fate of South Bowl and Mono Trees if Grand Targhee Expansion is approved.

Photo credit - Before: William H. Jackson, US Geological Survey; 1872. After: Mike Merigliano; 2017

The Wilderness Act of 1964 defines it as “an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain.” The Act’s purpose is to preserve and protect the natural ecosystems and wild areas and also provide opportunities for solitude and retrospective or primitive recreation.

“But perhaps one of the greatest benefits is what wilderness areas can do for a person. For those who travel into wilderness areas the experience can be awe inspiring and life changing. Those treks are what made great novels and critically acclaimed essays. Many who venture onto wilderness areas come back out changed with a deeper understanding of why these lands are set aside. Each person has their own story.”

The expansion of the Special Use Permit (SUP) into Teton Canyon would degrade the views from the Jedediah Wilderness forever. There will be scars left in the form of roads, chairlifts, tree removal and grading to achieve a smooth skiing surface. These alterations to the landscape will be seen from the wilderness and Grand Teton National Park. The sound of silence will be replaced with avalanche bombs, chairlifts, snow cats, snowmobiles, chain saws, heavy machinery, helicopters and people. The night sky will be illuminated by snowcats and chairlift terminals. Wildlife that lives in the area will be greatly disrupted by these changes.